The Cold War

 

 

 

The Kid Who Helped Catch 

a Cold War Spy

 
 
"Jimmy:" The Kid Who Helped Catch a Cold War Spy
A newspaper boy named “Jimmy” noticed that one of the coins he’d collected on his New York City paper route felt strange. When he dropped the nickel, it split in two. Inside was a tiny photo showing rows of numbers.
A few days later, in June 1953, the FBI heard about the strange coin. FBI agents thought the numbers might be a code and started an investigation that would last years, involve defectors and false identities, and uncover one of the most important Soviet spies ever captured during the Cold War. 
He went by the names “Mark” or “Emil Goldfus,” and seemed to be a regular American to his Brooklyn neighbors, but in reality he was a Colonel in the Soviet Union’s KGB spy service, Rudolph Ivanovich Abel. 

You can see film of Abel and his story below, and read more details at the FBI site here.
Abel was convicted of spying in 1957. Years later he was traded for Francis Gary Powers, the captured pilot of an American U2 spy plane shot down over the Soviet Union. 
If it hadn’t been for an observant kid, this important spy might never have been caught.
Abel was convicted of spying in 1957. Years later he was traded for Francis Gary Powers, the captured pilot of an American U2 spy plane shot down over the Soviet Union. 
If it hadn’t been for an observant kid, this important spy might never have been caught.

Abel was convicted of spying in 1957. Years later he was traded for Francis Gary Powers, the captured pilot of an American U2 spy plane shot down over the Soviet Union.


If it hadn’t been for an observant kid, this important spy might never have been caught.


[The story of "Jimmy" and the spy starts at app. 4:50 in the film below.]

The social studies activity book The Cold War: 1945-1989 is also popular with teachers.

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